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What is the difference between gregorian and fiscal calendar

What is the difference between gregorian and fiscal calendar.

if the dimension is a fical type: what kind of data will be in this dimension table.

same with gregorian calendar.

Can you please provide sample data may be 2 or 3 records.

That way will understand exactly difference in terms of teh data within each.

Thanks a lot for the helpful info.

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4 Answers

  • Posted on Jun 26, 2012 at 04:07 AM

    Hi,

    A Gregorian calendar is the Jan-Dec calendar that goes by what we call a Calendar Year.

    A Fiscal Calendar is the one that defines a fiscal year. Depending on the country, this can be Jan-Dec, Apr-Mar, Jul-Jun etc. There is an InfoObject Fiscal Variant that helps specify what kind of fiscal calendar we're working with, how many periods it has etc.

    If we have a fiscal year that goes from Apr-Mar, then the month of May 2012 can be represented in the Gregorian calendar as 05.2012. However, in the fiscal calendar it would be 002.2012.

    Regards,

    Suhas

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  • Posted on Jun 27, 2012 at 02:30 AM

    As mentioned previously - you have the gregorian calendar which is the date calendar.

    Fiscal calendar is more driven by the way the year is split into multiple reporting periods. You can have quarterly reporting , Monthly reporting , weekly reporting etc. The fiscal variant determines the number of fiscal periods you have in a fiscal year. 99% of the time it is 12 fiscal periods and they align with the "gregorian calendar: but there are cases where it can be otherwise.

    The same holds true for differently aligned calendars as pointed out above also...

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
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    Posted on Jun 28, 2012 at 02:18 PM

    Hi,

    Gregorian calendar ::

    This is our general year calender i.e. from Jan-Dec.

    For e.g. if we are following Jan 2012-Dec 2012, we are assuming that our financial year begins from Jan2012 & ends in Dec2012.

    Fiscal calendar ::

    This is our financial year what is working for our clients.

    For e.g. it may be either from Jan 2012-DEC 2012 or from March2012-Feb2013.

    For 2nd example Feb 2013 would act as 012.2012 in FISCAL year while in Gregorian Calender it would be represented as 02.2013.

    All depends on the no of periods the client wants to split the reporting data into. For example in our project, the one month data gets splitted into 16 periods.

    BR,

    Arpit

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    • Hi.

      So with fiscal calendar. if March-feb

      then Feb 2012 will be treated as 012.2012?

      That's right. If your fiscal calendar is from March-Feb, and if we assume that it has 12 periods, then Feb 2012 will be the 12th period of the financial year.

      That's what the fiscal calendar does - it defines a fiscal year, the number of periods in the year and the starting and ending dates of each period.

      Regards,

      Suhas

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Sep 11, 2016 at 06:51 AM

    This message was moderated.

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