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Former Member

RFC response times deteriorate with time

Hi

We notice that every time our system is restarted, performance is much improved for a the first few weeks. I can appreciate this from the fact that it is a huge system and things can 'clog up' after a while but we have been trying to isolate any specific cause / memory leaks etc.

One thing we have noticed is that although average dialog and background response times appear to increase gradually with time, RFC response times increase substantially. The first few days after a restart we see times of 2, 3 seconds, by the first week 7-10 seconds and by week two and beyond they are over 20 seconds.

We have 15 application servers and all the RFC traffic is load balanced using a RZ12 group that does not include the Central Instance; the same applies in SMQR & SMQS. We still do see some RFC traffic on the CI though... some of the application servers are on a different site, but we cannot see any differences in response times across sites...

Any ideas what's causing this and how we can keep these RFC response times down? The system is very busy and deals with a lot of RFC traffic, when users start complaining about poor performance we can usually see the system flooded with RFCs....

Due to size and nature of this system we can only arrange a restart every couple of months.

Thanks

Ross

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1 Answer

  • Best Answer
    Aug 03, 2011 at 12:13 PM

    Do you see any specific programs in ST03N called by RFCs who are getting "slower"?

    Markus

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    • Former Member

      Hi Markus, good question, but no, haven't noticed... not sure how I'd check either? There are hundreds (if not thousands) of different transactions ran each month, I'll try sorting the transactions by time for each day and see if there are any common longer runners that have increased, but think it'll be like looking for a needle in a haystack...