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backup strategy

Hi

our production server is based on win2008 - DB2 9.1. As tape drive is not supported in win2008, we plan to go for external hdd's . Is this recommended ?

Can anybody suggest me how many hdd's can be involved in this type of backup strategy ?

Thanks

Muthu

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Oct 12, 2010 at 11:53 AM

    >Can anybody suggest me how many hdd's can be involved in this type of backup strategy ?

    this depends on your database size and the disk size you are going to have and also whether you are going to compress the backup to disk.

    SAP recommends to keep the backup tapes offsite (not in server room) not sure how you are going to manage with external disk. Can't you order the tape drive with 2008 compatible?

    Or time being take backup to disk and attach the tape drive with 2003 server and again take backup from external disk to tape. As if something goes wrong with external disk then you will have a backup on tape.

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    • > Can't you order the tape drive with 2008 compatible?

      The problem is not the tape, the problem is, that you must have a 3rd party software on Windows to back up to a local tape, there are no more tape drivers delivered and no backup interface.

      > Or time being take backup to disk and attach the tape drive with 2003 server and again take backup from external disk to tape. As if something goes wrong with external disk then you will have a backup on tape.

      Since Windows 2003 is already out of support I would suggest using a (good) 3rd party backup tool to schedule the backup to tape.

      Markus

  • author's profile photo Former Member
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    Posted on Oct 12, 2010 at 01:34 PM

    Ultimately your backup solution must meet your business needs. First you must get the business to decide on how much transactional data loss is acceptable in a restore situation. This is best decided on in terms of time: 15 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, etc. You need to make that decision based on the assumption that a restore situation involves rebuilding your data center from scratch with only the offsite backups to work with (i.e. your data center wasleveled by a tornado, earthquake, etc)

    If you backup to HDD only, then you will not have any kind of offsite storage of your backups (unless you are doing remote drives), so on its own it is not the best Disaster Recovery plan.

    As Markus said, a tape solution can be used with a good backup software product. Tape will allow you to store your backups in a secure offsite location.

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
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    Posted on Oct 14, 2010 at 01:23 PM

    Hi Muttu,

    As replied in other responses, volume of HDD required depends on size of your backups( now and going forward), backup strategy and retention periods of backups.

    You may backup data to HDDs (say SAN storage) and copy data to different Data centre locations offline ( similar to keeping tapes offsite for DR) and/or take tape backup from storage location, after backup to disk is completed and store those tapes offsite and this may even improve backup/restore speed.

    Regards,

    Krishna

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
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    Posted on Oct 27, 2010 at 04:47 AM

    Dear gurus

    Thank you for your suggestions.

    It will be very helpful if someone share the backup software they use in this platform. (Win2008/DB29.1)

    Thanks

    Muthu

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    • Former Member

      Muthu,

      You don't say what database you are using (SQL, Oracle).

      If you are using SQL, I can highly recommend using MIcrosoft Data Protection Manager. We use the 2007 version - there is a 2010 version out now.

      The DPM system is in a location away from servers - it backs up all servers including several remote sites. It creates a replica of the data onto a storage unit, then synchronises changes at set intervals (we do it at hourly rate). It then also creates recovery points automatically, although you can create extra ones as needed.

      Admin is really straight forward. There is a particular process for SQL databases, and it manages the backup of the components including trans log very well. We tested recovery some while ago, and it proved to be very quick and fairly easy.

      The system also manages a backup to tape, so you can create a "disk to disk to tape" strategy for full BC / DR planning. For reference, I don't work for MS - but I think that DPM server is one of the best products that they don't promote.

  • author's profile photo Former Member
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    Posted on Oct 29, 2010 at 11:24 AM

    I agree with Joey Stephens. The backup should fit your business needs. When you think about backup are there any thoughts in why dont backup the SAP + DB servers with the hopefully existing backup device/environment? In case there there is enough capacity i would do it that way. If not then may think about buying new backup server + library. If you want to do backup to disk first then may think about copieng the files on a storage device or maybe hold the data direct on the backup server.

    My personal suggestion would be Backup Exec vom Symantec with the agents you need for your use like DB agent or whatever. I personally dont like Microsoft Data Protection Manager 2010. I miss there a lot of functions that are standard in other backup software products. Another software could be ArcServe.

    Think about what you want and then go for the best solution 😊

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