Skip to Content

When we Use HTTPS and HTTP

Hi Frnds,

when we Use HTTP's and HTTP.

Can anyone explain...

Regards,

Raj

Add a comment
10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

Assigned Tags

Related questions

10 Answers

  • Best Answer
    author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Jun 13, 2008 at 09:32 AM

    HTTP is plain protocol which is not on secure layer but HTTPS as name indicates is a secure HTTP protocol providing security for sensitive/confidential data

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • Posted on Jun 13, 2008 at 01:15 PM

    Hi

    A general defination of HTTP and HTTPS would be :

    HTTP

    HTTP is the protocol that a web browser such as Internet Explorer uses to request a web page from a web server.

    It can be "implemented on top of any other protocol on the Internet, or on other networks. HTTP only presumes a reliable transport; any protocol that provides such guarantees can be used."

    HTTPS

    HTTPS is an encrypted form of HTTP used for sending sensitive data like credit card numbers between the browser and the web server. This is also sometimes called Secure HTTP or SSL (which stands for Secure Sockets Layer).

    All XI runtime components using the HTTP protocol support the encryption of the HTTP data stream by means of the SSL protocol, also known as HTTPS. HTTPS data streams are completely transparent to the Exchange Infrastructure.

    To enable an HTTPS connection, two steps are required:

    ...

    1. Both parties of an HTTP connection (that is, the HTTPS client and the HTTPS server) must be technically enabled.

    2. The internal XI communications and the messaging communications must be configured in XI to use these HTTP connections.

    In addition, for certain adapters you can enforce HTTP security for incoming messages.

    Technically Enabling SSL

    Whenever a hardware or software component is to be enabled for SSL, the client and the server part of an HTTP connection have to be enabled differently. Moreover, the technical configuration for HTTPS is different for XI ABAP and J2EE components. For more information, see Transport Layer Security.

    HTTPS comes in two flavors, both ensuring the confidentiality of data sent over the network

    ● Server authentication

    Only the HTTP server identifies itself with a certificate that is to be verified by the client.

    ● Client authentication

    Additionally, the HTTP client identifies itself with a certificate that is to be verified by the server.

    Hope this clears your doubts

    Thanks

    Saiyog

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Jun 13, 2008 at 09:33 AM

    https to secure the connection with SSL and http otherwise.

    give a search in SDN to find loads of docs.

    Raghu

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Jun 13, 2008 at 09:48 AM
    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Jun 13, 2008 at 09:52 AM

    Dear Reddy,

    As this looks like a general question see the link below for the complete solution

    What is the Difference Between http and https?

    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-difference-between-http-and-https.htm

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Jun 13, 2008 at 09:55 AM

    HI

    HTTP it is a plain protocol it doesnt give much security.

    HTTPS it provides the security.

    refer the below links

    http://help.sap.com/saphelp_nw04/helpdata/en/14/ef2940cbf2195de10000000a1550b0/frameset.htm

    http://help.sap.com/saphelp_nw04s/helpdata/en/e8/1f1041a0f6f16fe10000000a1550b0/frameset.htm

    cheers

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • Posted on Jun 13, 2008 at 01:19 PM

    HTTP

    The HyperText Transfer Protocol is an application layer protocol, which means it focuses on how information is presented to the user of the computer but doesnu2019t care a whit about how data gets from Point A to Point B. It is stateless, which means it doesnu2019t attempt to remember anything about the previous Web session. This is great because there is less data to send, and that means speed. And HTTP operates on Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) Port 80 by default, meaning your computer must send and receive data through this port to use HTTP. Not just any old port will do

    HTTPS

    Secure HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTPS) is for all practical purposes HTTP. The chief distinction is that it uses TCP Port 443 by default, so HTTP and HTTPS are two separate communications. HTTPS works in conjunction with another protocol, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), to transport data safely. Remember, HTTP and HTTPS donu2019t care how the data gets to its destination. In contrast, SSL doesnu2019t care what the data looks like. People often use the terms HTTPS and SSL interchangeably, but this isnu2019t accurate. HTTPS is secure because it uses SSL to move data

    http://www.biztechmagazine.com/article.asp?item_id=277

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Jun 18, 2008 at 10:42 AM

    hi rajasekhar reddy

    Try to close the thread if you get suitable answers....hope you got it..

    DO ENCOURAGE SDNers

    Regards

    chandrakanth

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • Posted on Jun 18, 2008 at 10:44 AM

    thanks frnd

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Jun 18, 2008 at 10:46 AM

    It's all about keeping you secure

    HTTP stands for HyperText Transport Protocol, which is just a fancy way of saying it's a protocol (a language, in a manner of speaking) for information to be passed back and forth between web servers and clients.

    You really don't need to know what it all stands for; the important thing is the letter S which makes the difference between HTTP and HTTPS. The S (big surprise) stands for "Secure". You probably didn't need me to tell you that, because you already knew it had something to do with security.

    If you visit a website or webpage, and look at the address in the web browser, it will likely begin with the following: http://. This means that the website is talking to your browser using the regular 'unsecure' language. In other words, it is possible for someone to "eavesdrop" on your computer's conversation with the website. If you fill out a form on the website, someone might see the information you send to that site.

    This is why you never ever ever enter your credit card number in an http website!

    But if the web address begins with https://, that basically means your computer is talking to the website in a secure code that no one can eavesdrop on.

    You understand why this is so important, right? If a website ever asks you to enter your credit card information, you should automatically look to see if the web address begins with https://. If it doesn't, there's no way you're going to enter sensitive information like a credit card number!

    Check this ... for HTTPS...

    http://www.virtu-software.com/ask-doug/QandA.asp?subject=3&q=42

    *******Reward points,if found useful

    Add a comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

Before answering

You should only submit an answer when you are proposing a solution to the poster's problem. If you want the poster to clarify the question or provide more information, please leave a comment instead, requesting additional details. When answering, please include specifics, such as step-by-step instructions, context for the solution, and links to useful resources. Also, please make sure that you answer complies with our Rules of Engagement.
You must be Logged in to submit an answer.

Up to 10 attachments (including images) can be used with a maximum of 1.0 MB each and 10.5 MB total.