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Former Member

Qualified Lookup

Heyy All,

Please Help Me to Understand..

As qualified table is a special kind of lookup table and extreamly versatile.How it stores the records and Deals exactly with respect to Other lookup tables and what are it's significance ?

exact Solutions will be Rewarded.

Deepak

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4 Answers

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Dec 04, 2007 at 08:33 AM

    hi,

    follow this link:

    http://help.sap.com/search/highlightContent.jsp

    hope this may help you,

    Regards,

    Srinivas

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    • Former Member

      Hi Deepak,

      To be precise

      A qualified table is a special kind of table that is extremely flexible. It is normally used to store in an efficiently way complex relationships between a product record of the main table and one or more lookup table entries that contain various additional information concerning this product.

      Using qualified tables and qualifiers allow you to store a large amount of

      potentially sparse data. Doing so, n fields from the main table can be replaced

      with a single qualified lookup field in the main table. This qualified lookup field

      takes its values from a qualified table linked to it, table which has n records,

      corresponding to the n replaced fields of the main table and one or more

      qualifiers.

      Hope this will help you,

      Krutarth

      null

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Dec 04, 2007 at 06:16 PM

    Deepak,

    Here are some links to some blogs that have examples that may give you a better understanding of how qualified tables work.

    <a href="/people/pooja.khandelwal2/blog/2006/03/29/taming-the-animal--qualified-tables:///people/pooja.khandelwal2/blog/2006/03/29/taming-the-animal--qualified-tables

    <a href="/people/community.user/blog/2006/12/20/so-is-that-the-qualifier-or-the-non-qualifier:///people/community.user/blog/2006/12/20/so-is-that-the-qualifier-or-the-non-qualifier

    Regards,

    Tim

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    • Former Member

      Hi Deepak,

      Qualified table is the one which has a (qualifier) field whose value is dependent on another fileld(non qualifier).We always link this qualifier table with Main Table wrt

      qualified field.

      While importing u have to first map and import the non qualifier field from the qualifier table then from main table create compound field for the qualifier field in the main table and import the main table.

      Plz reward points if u find my answere helpful.

      Regards,

      Neethu.

  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Dec 04, 2007 at 05:21 AM

    Hi Deepak,

    A normal flat or hierarchy lookup table is effective for a single multi-valued lookup field when:

    (1) the lookup table contains a relatively small number of records compared to the main table.

    (2) the lookup table records themselves are standard for every main table record and represent a predefined and relatively fixed set of lookup values, such as a lookup into a list of legal manufacturer names.

    A qualified table is necessary when the number of lookup table records would otherwise be very large, because each main table record is related not just to the predefined lookup values of the lookup table records but also to one or more additional fields of information that are different for every main table record (such as quantity price breaks, multiple prices for different divisions, regions, or trading partners, or cross-reference part numbers for different distributors or contract customers). In these cases, the fields whose values are different for each main table record should be defined as qualifier fields of the qualified table; the qualified table will then contain an actual record for each of the predefined lookup values or value combinations (such as distributor, contract customer, division, region, or trading partner).

    &#61558; A qualified table used for multiple prices, cross-reference part numbers, or other distributor-specific information usually contains few, if any, lookup fields and multiple qualifiers.

    &#61558; Qualified table records also provide a way to store additional distributor/supplier/customer-specific information for each of multiple distributors/suppliers/customers for each main table record.

    &#61558; In practice, the use of qualifiers and a qualified table instead of normal fields and a subtable keeps the number of actual records in the qualified table very small, but since every link between a main table record and an instance of a qualified table record contains additional information, the number of qualified link table records necessary to store the additional information is very large, often larger than the number of records in the main table itself.

    When used for multiple prices or cross reference part numbers, qualified tables and qualifiers allow you to store a massive amount of potentially sparse data, by eliminating n fields from the main table and replacing them with a single qualified lookup field into a qualified table that has n corresponding records and one or more qualifiers. For example, n price fields, one for each distributor or quantity price break (or worse, each distributor/quantity price break combination) can be replaced with n qualified table records, one for each distributor/quantity price combination, and a qualifier for the price.

    BR

    Chinmoy

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Dec 04, 2007 at 06:02 AM

    Hi Deepak,

    To be specific,

    A qualified Table can be used when you have fields which are related to each other. Like one field is related to the value of other.

    To use this logic in MDM, you can use qualified tables in MDM. You have 2 type of fields while working with Qualified Tables:

    1. Non-Qualifiers: The fields which decide upon the value of the others can be taken as non- qualifer fields. Taking a simple ex. if Year is deciding Tax for the Year and there is a realtionship between both of them, then Year can be taken as non- qualifier.

    2. Qualifier Field: The fields whcih are a result of other fields. Like, Tax is a qualifer feild in the above example.

    Hence this is the understanding and use of MDM.

    Technically, you can see while working in MDM.

    Thanks and Regards

    Nitin Jain

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