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module pool program

Can any one give a brief explanation about what is module pool programming and a sample code for it

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
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    Posted on Nov 30, 2007 at 05:34 AM
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  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Nov 30, 2007 at 05:36 AM

    HI

    Screens are the most general type of user dialog that you can use in ABAP programs. You do not define them in ABAP programs, but instead in the Screen Painter. A screen consists of the input/output mask and the flow logic. You can define screens for any program with type 1, M, or F.

    The screens in a single ABAP program can be combined to form screen sequences. You can call single screens or screen sequences either using a transaction code from outside the ABAP program, or by using the CALL SCREEN statement in the corresponding ABAP program. When you call a screen or screen sequence, the screen flow logic takes control of the ABAP program execution. You can define screen sequences dynamically by setting the next screen attribute for a screen dynamically in the ABAP program.

    A screen consists of the input/output mask and the flow logic. The screen flow logic is divided into the Process Before Output (PBO) event, which is processed before the screen is displayed, and the Process After Input (PAI) event, which is processed after a user action on the screen.

    The following diagram shows the place of screens between the GUI status and the ABAP program:

    The screen flow logic calls dialog modules in the ABAP program, either to prepare the screen for display (PBO event) or to process the user's entries (PAI event). Screens are dynamic programs, and have their own data objects, called screen fields. These are linked to the input/output fields that appear on the screen itself. When the screen is displayed, and when it finishes processing, the system passes data between the screen fields and data objects in the ABAP program. Data is copied between identically-named fields.

    Each screen has a GUI status, containing a menu bar, standard toolbar, and an application toolbar. Like screens, GUI statuses are independent components of the ABAP program. You create them in the ABAP Workbench using the Menu Painter. You assign GUI statuses to screens dynamically in your ABAP programs. Each screen is linked to the current GUI status by a special screen field into which the corresponding function code is placed whenever the user chooses a function. The screen passes the function code to the ABAP program just like any other screen field. You can then read it in the program.

    Screen Attributes

    Like all objects in the R/3 Repository, screens have attributes that both describe them and determine how they behave at runtime. Important screen attributes for ABAP programming:

    Program

    The name of the ABAP program (type 1, M, or F) to which the screen belongs.

    Screen number

    A four-digit number, unique within the ABAP program, that identifies the screen within the program. If your program contains selection screens, remember that selection screens and Screen Painter screens use the same namespace. For example, if you have a program with a standard selection screen, you may not contain any further screens with the number 1000. Lists, on the other hand, have their own namespace.

    Screen type

    A normal screen occupies a whole GUI window. Modal dialog boxes only cover a part of a GUI window. Their interface elements are also arranged differently. Selection screens are generated automatically from the definition in the ABAP program. You may not define them using the Screen Painter. A subscreen is a screen that you can display in a subscreen area on a different screen in the same ABAP program.

    Next screen

    Statically-defined screen number, specifying the next screen in the sequence. If you enter zero or leave the field blank, you define the current screen as the last in the chain. If the next screen is the same as the current screen, the screen will keep on calling itself. You can override the statically-defined next screen in the ABAP program.

    Cursor position

    Static definition of the screen element on which the cursor is positioned when the screen is displayed. By default, the cursor appears on the first input field. You can overwrite the static cursor position dynamically in your ABAP program.

    Screen group

    Four-character ID, placed in the system field SY-DYNGR while the screen is being processed. This allows you to assign several screens to a common screen group. You can use this, for example, to modify all of the screens in the group in a uniform way. Screen groups are stored in table TFAWT.

    Hold data

    If the user calls the screen more than once during a terminal session, he or she can retain changed data as default values by choosing System ® User profile ® Hold data.

    Screen Attributes

    Like all objects in the R/3 Repository, screens have attributes that both describe them and determine how they behave at runtime. Important screen attributes for ABAP programming:

    Program

    The name of the ABAP program (type 1, M, or F) to which the screen belongs.

    Screen number

    A four-digit number, unique within the ABAP program, that identifies the screen within the program. If your program contains selection screens, remember that selection screens and Screen Painter screens use the same namespace. For example, if you have a program with a standard selection screen, you may not contain any further screens with the number 1000. Lists, on the other hand, have their own namespace.

    Screen type

    A normal screen occupies a whole GUI window. Modal dialog boxes only cover a part of a GUI window. Their interface elements are also arranged differently. Selection screens are generated automatically from the definition in the ABAP program. You may not define them using the Screen Painter. A subscreen is a screen that you can display in a subscreen area on a different screen in the same ABAP program.

    Next screen

    Statically-defined screen number, specifying the next screen in the sequence. If you enter zero or leave the field blank, you define the current screen as the last in the chain. If the next screen is the same as the current screen, the screen will keep on calling itself. You can override the statically-defined next screen in the ABAP program.

    Cursor position

    Static definition of the screen element on which the cursor is positioned when the screen is displayed. By default, the cursor appears on the first input field. You can overwrite the static cursor position dynamically in your ABAP program.

    Screen group

    Four-character ID, placed in the system field SY-DYNGR while the screen is being processed. This allows you to assign several screens to a common screen group. You can use this, for example, to modify all of the screens in the group in a uniform way. Screen groups are stored in table TFAWT.

    Hold data

    If the user calls the screen more than once during a terminal session, he or she can retain changed data as default values by choosing System ® User profile ® Hold data.

    tell me ur mailid. I will send u the documents related to that.

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Nov 30, 2007 at 05:39 AM

    hI,

    Simple way to expalin Module pool programming is, its like a VB..

    create ur own GUI screen and writing the code for it.

    Reply Baack..

    With Rgds,

    S.Bharanidaran

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