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what is the diference for use either http:// or urn: in the namespace

Hi friends.

Anybody can say me, what is the diference for use either http:// or urn: in the namespace of the software component version.

Regards.

Sergio Gómiz

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    author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Mar 09, 2007 at 01:01 PM

    Serigo,

    their is no difference b/w these in deinfing SWCV.

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Mar 09, 2007 at 12:18 PM

    Hi Serigo,

    when you create a Namespace as http:// it becomes a URI .

    when you create a namespace as URN: it is basically a URI without protocol assignment.

    There is no difference between the two technically and the namespace you fromat you use depends on the naming convention of the organization.

    Namespace is a means of organinzing your content inside the SWCV . It allows you to modularize and split your objects and also allows multiple objects to have the same name .

    In java terminology a namespace can be associated with a package.

    Regards,

    Ramesh.

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Mar 09, 2007 at 12:19 PM

    You can use 2 types of namespaces ie Globally Identifiers.....

    URN :Universal Resource Name........without having protocol

    EX: urn:XYZ

    URI:Universal Resource Locator........with protocol

    http:
    XYZ

    You can follow any convention...

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  • Posted on Mar 09, 2007 at 12:28 PM

    Hi Sergio,

    <b>HTTP:</b> Short for HyperText Transfer Protocol, the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web. HTTP defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions Web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands. For example, when you enter a URL in your browser, this actually sends an HTTP command to the Web server directing it to fetch and transmit the requested Web page.

    For more details about HTTP please check below link:

    http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/H/HTTP.html

    <b>URN :</b> A URN (Uniform Resource Name) is an Internet resource with a name that, unlike a URL, has persistent significance - that is, the owner of the URN can expect that someone else (or a program) will always be able to find the resource. A frequent problem in using the Web is that Web content is sometimes moved to a new site or a new page on the same site. Since links are made using Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), they no longer work when content is moved.

    A URN looks something like a URL. For example, here's a hypothetical URN:

    urn:def://alpha_peter

    where "def://" might indicate an agency or an accessible directory of all dictionaries, glossaries, and encyclopedias on the Internet and "blue laser" was the name of a term. The result of using the agency could be the "best definition," the "longest definition," or even all definitions that the agency could find of "blue laser."

    A comparable URL would need to specify one specific location for a definition such as:

    http://www.abcex.com/alpha.htm

    For more about URN please check below link:

    http://searchwebservices.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid26_gci214164,00.html

    Hope it is clear.

    Regards,

    Prasanthi.

    ***Plz reward marks for helpful answers****

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Mar 09, 2007 at 01:14 PM

    thanks all!!

    I understand this issue is a business convention for organize the package, and it haven't a great importance for the futher.

    I thought so, but I wanted to be sure.

    I will recompense you ...

    Regards.

    Sergio Gómiz

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    • Former Member

      I recommend to use "urn:";

      In some cases "http://" can cause trouble, for example when sending messages to the HTTP-Plain-Adapter. In this case you need to pass the namespace as URL-param, and when doing this, you have to "escape" the slashes of the "http://"-prefix.

      Overall:

      With "http://" you have almost never problems, with "urn:" you have never problems.

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