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Former Member

Difference between soa and esoa

Hi,

What is the difference between SOA AND ESOA.

Regards

Abhay

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4 Answers

  • Best Answer
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    Former Member
    Jan 08, 2007 at 08:52 AM

    Hi,

    SOA is an idea of creating composite apllications based on reusable building blocks using open standards like Web Services, WSDL, SOAP, UDDI.

    SOA is more technical, ESOA (former ESA - Enterprise Service Architecture) created by SAP is more business focus.

    Composite applications are created based on Enterprise Services and Business Objects.

    Enterprise Services are web services with business value and are reusable parts of business processes.

    Enterprise Services Repository - part of SAP NetWeaver is central point of ESOA and starting point for creating applications.

    Regards

    Krzysztof Ziemba

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  • Jan 08, 2007 at 10:31 AM

    Hi,

    here are interesting articles about ESOA.

    article" target="_blank">https://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/sdn/developerareas/esa/esworkplace?rid=/webcontent/uuid/43918aa2-0c01-0010-a7bc-cbd200acc9bb">article [original link is broken] [original link is broken]

    Regards,

    Boris Mueller

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    • Former Member

      Hi,

      SOA is more generic. Any system that provides web services (which are self-contained and self-describing) can be termes as SOA enabled. The provider of the service registers the service over UDDI in the form of WSDL. The consumer searches the UDDI for the desired service and invokes it. There can be multiple web services (from multiple providers) for the same application (eg. purchase order creation).

      eSOA is SAP's own version of SOA (more specialized version of SOA). SAP calls the services developed over the Business Process Platform and Enterprise Serivces. There enterprise services are different that web services in the sense that there will only one generic service (registered at UDDI) for one application. These services have business sematics and are stateful (means that they carry out an entire business process spanning multiple application components) - output of one enterprise service provides the feed and trigger for another enterprise service.

      Hope this helps.

      Regards,

      Gajendra.

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    Former Member
    Jan 09, 2007 at 05:45 AM

    Hi

    In a nutshell, ESOA are simply Web services that provide enterprise-level business functionality.They may range from very simple lookup services (like finding a company’s location or product offerings) to more complex and composite services — but what they have in common is that they’re highly integrated into your process or application.Typically ESOA are high-level components that take more granular Web services and aggregate them into reusable elements with business value. For example, take the service Cancel Purchase Order. An elementary Web service like Delete Purchase Order would simply lead to the deletion of a purchase order in the corresponding database. However, if the stated goal is “cancel purchase order,” the service has to become a more far-reaching enterprise service that handles this process end-to-end, and therefore has to trigger a number of follow-up actions, including:

    => Check against production orders

    => Check against a corresponding billing process

    => Update of inventory/warehouse information Or consider the Credit Limit Check

    service, which at first glance seems to be quite simple. Normally, this service is one ingredient of the Order Creation service. But typically, credit checking is

    really a more elaborate composite service.

    5 Key Principles of ESOA

    1. Abstraction — hiding confusing details

    2. Modularity — breaking down complexity, resulting in reusable pieces

    3. Standardized connectivity — enabling flexible composition of services to

    create bigger processes and scenarios

    4. Loose coupling — allowing for separate evolution of the various components

    without breaking any points of integration

    5. Incremental design — enabling changes to composition and configuration

    without affecting the interior of components, and vice versa

    Regards,

    Satyendra

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    Former Member
    Jan 09, 2007 at 06:29 AM

    As far as I can see it SOA is a concept (and architecture concept) that might help you to build more agile IT and business. SOA is the concept of using services and there are several technical solutions for services, which one of them are web services.

    enterprise SOA is SAP extension of SOA. enterprise SOA extend SOA by providing out of the box services for your enterprise needs (ERP, CRM, SRM, etc'). using those services you can create SOA implementation of your enterprise. Imagine that cars were build from parts rather then predefined components, how much time it would take to create a car? assembling a car from components is the same as enterprise SOA. we know what are the common IT components that enterprise use today (and we can even tune it by industry), and we use this knowledge to build all of our applications by now. the Idea behind enterprise SOA is to provide you most of the services that you need to create your SOA architecture as well as a platform to run those services.

    HTH,

    Natty Gur.

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    • Former Member Former Member

      Thanks for that link. Can someone tell me, when I click on one of the process components, for example: "Accounting" under ERP, there are a whole bunch of enterprise service interfaces listed. Am I correct that each one of these is a distinct, reusable enterprise service, and that accounting is just a categorization to group them? Or is accounting the enterprise service, and each of those interfaces the different operations?

      I'm just trying to clarify the granularity, or what level is actually the enterprise service.

      Thanks!

      Matt