SQL statement or table to get job-global script link for "Call script in case of error"

Hello there,

I got another question for the IDM folks here.

We're on IDM 7.2 and I'm doing some more documentation of my IDM system and now I'm looking for an good way to find out which global script is used in which job as the "Call script in case of error" option on the "Logging" tab of jobs.

Or for the first step: For which jobs this option is filled.

I'm not really looking forward to check each of our jobs manually, so I'm hoping some of you have already found the table or SQL statement to get this link.

.

The table "mc_job_script_link" sounds perfect for this, but it is empty for me (OPER-user), so no luck there.

.

Does anybody have any other idea or do I really have to go about this manually?

.

Regards,

Steffi.

screenshot095.jpg (30.1 kB)
Add comment
10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

  • Get RSS Feed

2 Answers

  • Best Answer
    Mar 30, 2017 at 08:28 AM

    You should have said you're on MSS right away ;)

    Try this.

    Kind regards, L

    Add comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

    • maybe MMC behaves in a way that the element initally doesn't exist, but if an error script is added and later deleted, the XML ends up with an empty (instead of a non-existing) element. Try it out.

      .

      Yep, that happens, I checked.

  • Mar 29, 2017 at 10:10 AM

    Hi Steffi,

    the error script is referenced inside the job definition from XML element /EMS/DSEJobs/Job/Common/ERRFUNCTION, which means you could report on it if you first BASE64-decode the job definition's XML (MC_JOBS.JOBDEFINITION), and then query the plain XML using your database's XQuery/XPath support in SQL. It's comparatively easy on MSSQL, but to do it in Oracle, you'll need custom PL/SQL code because the job definition is stored as data type LONG.

    Kind regards, Lambert

    Add comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded

    • Hi Lambert,

      I'm on MSSQL, but I have to admit I never ventured into the job definitions (decode them etc).

      Thank you for the pointer, though. At least now I know it's in the definition (I feared so much). I'll check this mysterious decoding out. :)

      .

      Regards,

      Steffi.

Skip to Content