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Former Member

NWDI / JSPM / CMS advice

I am trying to manage java development (some jsp,some dynpro, and some xi objects). My problem is that we dont believe that we have a large enough infrastructure to warrant a full blown NWDI setup. I am just looking for a way to track and automaticaly move java dev objects. We have < or = 10 developers.

Essentailly I am looking to get away from using excel spreadsheets and ftp to move archives.

Any advice?

Thanks

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3 Answers

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    Former Member
    May 18, 2006 at 06:46 AM

    You say you believe you don't have a large enough infrastructure <b>yet</b>(!)... Try to get an idea of what might be coming in the future.

    For Web Dynpro and XI development, NWDI is the ideal way to do Software Lifecycle Management, since NWDI is the only SLM software known with these proprietary development objects...

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    • Former Member

      Hi,

      According to me Pascal is very correct. Even though you have 10 developrs at present but in future that strength may increase, some may leave and some new might join. So better use NWDI(JDI) for versioning, cetral build etc services. I am sure that will be much more helpfull to you. If you don't want to go for JDI then you can also use versioning systems like CVS, SVN etc which are open source and freely available.

      Best regards,

      Guru.

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    Former Member
    May 18, 2006 at 11:37 AM

    Thats what other people are saying as well. Do you guys have any idea of the work effort and time it will take to implement NWDI/JDI?

    Thanks

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    • Hi Jeremy,

      for a productive installation and configuration, I would say that you should count with five days, starting from installing the application server. If there are some special topics in your system landscape (e.g. you already have a SLD, central or local useradministration etc.) that should be considered, the planning can perhaps take a little bit longer.

      As well, it would be good advice to train your developers. This ensures that you understand the concepts so you are able to use all the advantages of the NWDI (and go around the traps *g).

      Best regards,

      Timo

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    Former Member
    May 21, 2006 at 01:57 AM

    Installing and configuration a JDI landscape only takes a few days (as long and you already have an SLD), and it's well worth the effort even with only 10 developers.

    Here's a few lessons I learned that may help you out.

    - Install it on it's own system. Do not install it on one of your dev servers, or your SLD. Trust me on that one!

    - Your CBS should be on the same system type as your productive landscape (windows <-> windows, UNIX <-> UNIX, etc).

    - Same is true for Java version.

    - Use SP15 or higher. Below that and you run into a few very annoying bugs.

    - Your first development configuratin should be "Hello World" or something similar. This will give your developers (and you) something to learn on. This is also a great way to introduce new developers to the JDI safely.

    - Watch the memory usage closely. Building large projects can consume a lot of memory outside the JVM.

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