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Hi All,

We use 'pushd' command to map a network drive for copying or deletion of files. I have seen the temporary drive letter is automatically getting deleted without using the 'popd' command which is created by pushd. Is Redwood capable of doing this automatically?. Please advise.

Please see below example.

@echo off


pushd \\SRVABC\Redwood\out\

if exist test.txt (
MOVE /y \\SRVABC\Redwood\out\test.txt \\SRVDEF\Redwood\in\
If ERRORLEVEL 1 EXIT /b 1
echo test.txt "copied to DEF server"
) else (
echo test.txt "not found"
exit /b 1
)

Thanks,

Tinku

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1 Answer

  • Best Answer
    Posted on Dec 14, 2015 at 08:03 PM

    Hi Tinku,

    No magic, there.

    You can reproduce with two cmd.exe sessions.

    Open cmd.exe twice and type in the first:

    pushd \\SRVABC\Redwood\out\

    you will end up in a mapped drive, like z:\

    in the second cmd.exe, type:

    dir z:\

    And you will see the contents.

    Close the first cmd.exe.

    Type dir z:\ in the lone (second) cmd.exe

    You get "The system cannot find the path specified."

    Once a CMD process completes in CPS, it is terminated ... any mapped drive using pushd is removed as well (standard Windows behavior).

    Issue "net use" if you want persistent shares.

    Regards,

    HP

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