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Indexed Table

Hi,

Please tell me what is indexed table. And what is the use of it?

Thanks,

sriram.

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5 Answers

  • Posted on Oct 21, 2005 at 07:20 AM

    Hi,

    While creating table,in addition to primary key fields,we can specify index.

    Kindly reward points by clicking the star on the left of reply,if it helps.

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
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    Posted on Oct 21, 2005 at 07:21 AM

    Hi Sriram,

    I assume you are talking about indexed internal tables..

    Standard and Sorted tables are collectively called index tables, since they can be accessed via the index of the record.

    Hashed tables can only be accessed using the key, and do not fall under this category.

    Sudha

    Message was edited by: Sudha Mohan

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  • Posted on Oct 21, 2005 at 07:33 AM

    Hi..

    An index is an efficiency mechanism for quickly finding rows within a table. It is needed because data is stored in a table in the order in which it was added

    An index is a copy of specific columns of a table sorted in ascending order.

    Indexes speed up select statements. A select should always be supported by an index.

    You can create secondary indexes on a table. Create one when you cannot use the fields of an existing index in your where clause.

    The fields in a where clause should be listed in your program in the same order as they appear in the index.

    Transaction ST05 can be used to show which index, if any, was used by a given select statement.

    Each index in R/3 has a unique one to three character identifier, or id. The primary index always has an id of 0 (zero). A secondary index id can be any other number or an alphabetic character.

    Example:

    Picture yourself ripping all the pages out of this book and then throwing them into the air and mixing them all up. You then gather them into a stack without regard to any sort of order. If you were to look for a single page number within that stack, how would you do it?

    Some people might just hunt and peck though the stack hoping to find it. I'm sure that most would soon give up and then turn the pages one by one. Obviously, this job would be easier if the pages were all back in order. With the pages in order, you could start somewhere in the middle and knowing which way to turn, you could quickly zero in on the page you want.

    Imagine that you have now put the pages back in order. Picking up the newly ordered book, perhaps you begin to look for the page that describes SE16. Where do you look? You don't know the page number, so you look in the index. The index contains the most important words sorted in alphabetical order. You quickly locate SE16 in the index and obtain a page number. Using that, search through the book to find that page.

    To create an index, the publisher duplicates important information and then sorts it, placing it at the end of the book apart from the rest. When you look at it, are you looking at the original information? No, of course not. You are looking at a copy of the original information; it has been duplicated. The book takes up a little more space on your bookshelf because of the index, it adds a little to the price of the book because of the time and effort required to create it, but no one complains because it saves so much time when you want to find something.

    A table in the database is a lot like this book. Each row is given a sequential number when it is added to a table, much like a page number. The important columns are copied to an index and sorted, much like the index at the back of the book. To find any piece of data, the system searches the index first to find the row number and then quickly finds the row.

    Regards

    Afsal

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
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    Posted on Oct 21, 2005 at 08:34 AM

    For creating a fully-generic table type.

    Data types defined using generic types can currently only be used for field symbols

    and for interface parameters in procedures . The generic type INDEX TABLE includes

    standard tables and sorted tables. These are the two table types for which index access is

    allowed. You cannot pass hashed tables to field symbols or interface parameters defined in this

    way. The generic type ANY TABLE can represent any table. You can pass tables of all three

    types to field symbols and interface parameters defined in this way. However, these field

    symbols and parameters will then only allow operations that are possible for all tables, that is,

    index operations are not allowed.

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  • author's profile photo Former Member
    Former Member
    Posted on Oct 21, 2005 at 08:39 AM

    > Hi,

    >

    > Please tell me what is indexed table. And what is the

    > use of it?

    >

    > Thanks,

    > sriram.

    An indexed table is a type of internal table

    for all info on these report to help.sap.com site here

    http://help.sap.com/saphelp_47x200/helpdata/en/fc/eb366d358411d1829f0000e829fbfe/content.htm

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