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DataGuard How-To

Hi,

I would like to test Oracle Data Guard with existing ECC 6.00 system on Windows 2003 R2 with Oracle 11.2... I find this document:

http%3A%2F%2Fwww.oracle.com%2Fus%2Fsolutions%2Fsap%2Fwp-ora4sap-dataguard11g-303811.pdf&ei=-ngzUraJBPOw7Ab_mIHABQ&usg=AFQjCNE5hq_EW9cvRCRioWrhtyxyvb4fRg&sig2=7-Ab1_EQBAJMOpgrYrqGcA&bvm=bv.52164340,d.ZGU

Have you any other ?

Thank you.

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5 Answers

  • Best Answer
    Sep 14, 2013 at 02:57 AM

    Hi Ganimede,

    Refer below links

    http://tinky2jed.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/configure-dataguard-11gr2-physical-standby-part-i.pdf

    A video on step by step configuration at

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHpd1Yn4b0w

    Hope this helps.

    Regards,

    Deepak Kori

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  • Sep 14, 2013 at 11:42 AM

    This is more than enough as it comes from Oracle.

    http://www.oracle.com/us/solutions/sap/wp-ora4sap-dataguard11g-303811.pdf

    Referring to multiple guides and that too from third parties will lead you nowhere (mostly)

    Follow the standard practices.

    Regards

    RB

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  • Sep 14, 2013 at 01:44 PM
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    Former Member
    Nov 18, 2013 at 09:46 AM
    Dear Ganimede Dignan,

    Can you tell us here, what Data guard method you are going to configure your environment.?

    Like

    Please specify the following "Physical Standby Type".

    1.Maximum Performance Mode,

    2.Maximum Availability Mode,

    3.Maximum Protection Mode.

    Also You can use Data Guard Broker.

    Are you going to configure 1.Local DR or 2.Remote DR and your bandwidth tell us to give good solution for you.

    Thanks

    Mahendran

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    • Hello

      >1.Maximum Performance Mode,

      >2.Maximum Availability Mode,

      >3.Maximum Protection Mode.

      mhmmm what is the difference?

      5.6.1 Choosing a Data Protection Mode

      To determine the appropriate data protection mode to use, review the following descriptions of the data protection modes to help assess your business requirements for data availability against user demands for response time and performance. Also, see Section 5.6.2 for information about setting up the data protection mode.

      5.6.1.1 Maximum Protection Mode

      This protection mode ensures that no data loss will occur if the primary database fails. To provide this level of protection, the redo data needed to recover each transaction must be written to both the local online redo log and to the standby redo log on at least one standby database before the transaction commits. To ensure data loss cannot occur, the primary database shuts down if a fault prevents it from writing its redo stream to at least one remote standby redo log. For multiple-instance RAC databases, Data Guard shuts down the primary database if it is unable to write the redo records to at least one properly configured database instance. The maximum protection mode requires that at least one standby instance has a standby redo log and the LGWR, SYNC, and AFFIRM attributes be used on the LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_n parameter for this destination.

      5.6.1.2 Maximum Availability Mode

      This protection mode provides the highest level of data protection that is possible without compromising the availability of the primary database. Like maximum protection mode, a transaction will not commit until the redo needed to recover that transaction is written to the local online redo log and to at least one remote standby redo log. Unlike maximum protection mode, the primary database does not shut down if a fault prevents it from writing its redo stream to a remote standby redo log. Instead, the primary database operates in maximum performance mode until the fault is corrected and all gaps in redo log files are resolved. When all gaps are resolved, the primary database automatically resumes operating in maximum availability mode.

      This mode ensures that no data loss will occur if the primary database fails, but only if a second fault does not prevent a complete set of redo data from being sent from the primary database to at least one standby database.

      Like maximum protection mode, the maximum availability mode requires that you:

      Configure standby redo log files on at least one standby database.

      Set the SYNC, LGWR, and AFFIRM attributes of the LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_n parameter for at least 1 standby database.

      5.6.1.3 Maximum Performance Mode

      This protection mode (the default) provides the highest level of data protection that is possible without affecting the performance of the primary database. This is accomplished by allowing a transaction to commit as soon as the redo data needed to recover that transaction is written to the local online redo log. The primary database's redo data stream is also written to at least one standby database, but that redo stream is written asynchronously with respect to the commitment of the transactions that create the redo data.

      When network links with sufficient bandwidth are used, this mode provides a level of data protection that approaches that of maximum availability mode with minimal impact on primary database performance.

      The maximum performance mode enables you to either set the LGWR and ASYNC attributes, or set the ARCH attribute on the LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_n parameter for the standby database destination. If the primary database fails, you can reduce the amount of data that is not received on the standby destination by setting the LGWR and ASYNC attributes.

      Source:

      http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14239/log_transport.htm

      >Also You can use Data Guard Broker.

      what is it?

      Check this link:

      Oracle Data Guard Broker Concepts

      Regards

      RB

  • Dec 23, 2013 at 11:04 AM

    A question, after each log was sented and applied on standby host... are they deleted?

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    • Hi Ganimede,

      sorry, i don't get it.

      What's the issue with using FRA and setting the (default) archive log deletion policy on standby side? Yes, the deletion policy is done with RMAN client, but using RMAN for backups, etc. are not a prerequisite of it. Oracle handles the applied archive logs automatically in such a configuration.

      You also use (Data Guard) redo transmission and do not perform archive log shipping and apply by script. Your external self-written script will never be as clever as the integrated archive log deletion policy.

      Regards

      Stefan