Skip to Content

Feedback requested - Editing and Accepting

Recently a question was posted regarding the lack of the ability to edit comments to a question, https://answers.sap.com/questions/632028/bug-unable-to-edit-comment-to-question.html.

The result of the question [Implied] "Is this a bug?" was no - it's actually by design, for now this is what it is. We are watching though to see how your feedback rolls in around this and if need be we will adjust in the future.

The second part of this was that I, as the person who answered, who also has the permissions was able to mark this as "accepted answer" - the logic of doing so "THIS IS THE ANSWER" to at least the implied question, it was implied as well as there was no real question just pointed out that something was not working and they put "BUG" in the title hence the implied question "Is this is a bug?" Now the feedback we are looking for going forward - should moderators or other users be able to "accept their own answer?" It does not happen often but the response does make me wonder - should it even be possible period? From our side of the fence we do see the value in the ability, like in cases like this where we are answering a question about the platform and if something is a bug or not; but questions like that could also just be put here to the Coffee Corner as discussions instead? General thoughts from everyone?


* Please Login or Register to Comment on or Follow discussions.

21 Comments

  • Sep 21 at 06:59 AM

    It's quite limiting in my opinion: a wrong click, a little distraction, you forgot something and... you need to add another comment to explain what you meant and what you missed, risking to cause more confusion in the readers.

    In my opinion, a comment shouldn't be editable if there is a child-comment, but until it's alone, why not?

    Or give a time, like 10 mins after the entry, if none already replied the comment, you can edit it.

    • Sep 21 at 07:03 AM

      A little note: by design this too?? :)

      by-design.png (27.8 kB)
      • Sep 21 at 04:32 PM

        It's been around forever, so at this point I view it as a feature tbh. :)

    • Sep 21 at 07:14 AM

      "In my opinion, a comment shouldn't be editable if there is a child-comment, but until it's alone, why not?" - 100% agree!

      And the same logic has to be used for other types of posts: questions, answers, comments to questions etc!

  • Sep 21 at 06:59 AM

    In general moderators are able to "Accept" any answer to any question, including own answer. And sometimes they are doing it - nothing wrong. But it has to be done only when the correctness of the answer is obvious. In this particular case there is a discussion: bug / by design. And number of Community users definitely named it as "bug" or "bug in design", because there is no logic to prevent users for editing the latest comment to question when everything else can be edited (at least immediately after posting).

  • Sep 21 at 07:20 AM

    Simone Milesi changes on the UI are rolling through right now so I will let the team know about the text bleeding off (that is a bug). In regards to your other comment I do like the logic there, 10 minutes or until another action on the question happens. With that logic we could actual make the time limit longer as the context only changes once something else is posted so editable until the context changes - good feedback thank you!

  • Sep 21 at 07:49 AM

    Vadim Kalinin "never" is not a time limit in my book, the last thing I want is edits on things a year old. A reasonable time limit is a must.

    • Sep 21 at 08:09 AM

      In the real life nobody edit posts older then one month. 30 days limit will not change anything, but will not do any harm.

      The first thing to be implemented is the rule: "edit/delete allowed with no replies only"! In past I had a long discussion with Mynyna Chau about this rule (in March 2018).

      • Sep 21 at 04:21 PM

        That seems to make sense to me and I've seen this in other forums too. You can edit anything unless there is a reply. I doubt anyone goes out of the way to edit anything older than a few days though, so for me adding a time limit would just be a solution to a non-existent problem, from the user perspective. I don't know, of course, what goes on in the back-end and if this is related to some DB issue.

  • Sep 21 at 08:03 AM

    See, I was not part of the mentioned question, I've just read it before your current question.

    The "forced accepted answer" in such cases (i.e. with discussions about probably undesired UI features) is something that feels plain wrong to me. It would make me stop asking further questions of that kind. I'm not usually that bold but you have asked for feedback...:)

    It is very different from the situation where the OP would himself choose to accept the "status quo", like saying "okay, it could be solved better, but here we go...".

    ----

    That being said, when a moderator later accepts an answer which

    • is obviously correct or
    • has been obviously "accepted" by the OP by providing an according comment, but forgetting/ignoring not clicking the button,

    that's very fine with me. I'm doing that now and then in the forum I moderate, too.

    • Sep 21 at 08:11 AM

      And just to add to the "Do we need to be able to edit our replies" discussion:

      I have rarely got any of mine replies corrent in the first take, I nearly always manage to enter some spelling errors, formatting issues or the like, or using "bad English". - And I don't feel okay when I'm not able to correct those, even if there has already been a reply.

      ----

      It would be interesting to know how many "edits" focus on just correcting typos/formatting and the like compared to those cases where the contents is totally modified. In my opinion, this "we must not edit replies with further replies" mantra focussed too much on the later kind of "corrections".

      • Sep 21 at 08:17 AM

        And to be more specific:

        A rule that prevents edits as soon as replies are made is focussed on preventing undesired/bad behaviour (namely totally modifying one's contents), but restricts good behaviour (correcting contents).

        If the goal is to make the users of this community to act more professionally - why then not trying to ease better behaviour?

        • Sep 21 at 08:30 AM

          Sorry, but have to repeat that in most cases it will not restrict good behavior. You post something, see post results and decide to correct typo. You will be able to do it due to the fact that in the real life reply will not happen immediately... It was working absolutely fine in old SCN. I remember only few times when my correction was not accepted due to reply. No issues, I used comment to correct.

      • Sep 21 at 08:24 AM

        Hi Volker,

        I have a lot of cases when question or answer is edited resulting in missing conversation logic. Sometimes users also delete answers with my comments under the answers...

        Typo/formatting mistakes? In 99% cases you have time to correct mistakes before reply. In the remaining 1% - not a disaster, extra comment will do the job!

      • Sep 21 at 03:37 PM
        It would be interesting to know how many "edits" focus on just 
        correcting typos/formatting and the like compared to those cases where 
        the contents is totally modified.

        This is a good point. While I'm not denying that what others mentioned (people editing content beyond recognition) has been happening and it can be quite annoying to others, I just feel it's not as big of an issue. That's why I never voted on the idea someone posted on this long time ago.

        But that's why we used to have Idea place - someone can post an idea and then others can vote/comment to determine priority and fine-tune the details. Instead what has been happening (and continues to happen, it seems) is that SCN team just cherry-picks random ideas, implements them in a wrong way and then is surprised when there is an uproar. These rakes have been stepped on so many times it's not even funny.

    • Sep 21 at 04:12 PM

      I'm totally with you on those two cases when it's OK for a moderator to accept an answer. This needs to be done with some caution and good judgement though, that's why I would not really want or expect to see this as a routine practice.

  • Sep 21 at 09:04 AM

    i just noticed i totally skipped the second part of your question about the "force an answer as accepted".

    i tend to agree with Vadim Kalinin about the topic on it so this reply is somehow useless, but.. well, maybe you can use it like a kind of statistic.

  • Sep 21 at 03:27 PM

    Just like with some technical questions here, I have to ask back first - what are you trying to achieve and are you asking the right question?

    To clarify the context - the answer you've offered in the linked post was out of context. The question was about editing a comment and the answer was about editing a question. It might be an answer but not to the question asked. At first I thought this was just an honest mistake (happens with anyone, the question is either misread or misunderstood, no biggie). But now I see that in this post you're stated the nature of the question correctly. Which makes me even more confused...

    If memory serves, it has been possible to edit any comment so far. According to Vadim's post, this functionality stopped working. From the user's perspective, if something worked fine and suddenly doesn't work is a definition of a "bug". If you feel differently that's fine but it doesn't make the question wrong and does not negate what other person feels.

    The SAP Community members were specifically requested to post about any bugs in form of a question in the Community tag (formerly "Using SAP.com"). We've started adding [BUG] to the title to separate "bug reports" from general questions. If it turns out not to be a bug or no action needed/possible usually the question is just closed by OP.

    But back to the "feedback". The specific question is "Should moderators or other users be able to accept their own answer?" AFAIK the moderators already can accept any answers. OP can accept their own answer too. This seems fine as it is.

    More important question to ask here IMHO - should moderators use their ability to accept their own answers? I feel this should not be a routine practice and I'm not sure what purpose would this serve.

    As you see, when a moderator accepts an answer the OP cannot change that. So even if a better answer provided by someone else, there is no way to make that "best" answer. In this case the moderator essentially "answer-blocks" everyone else. What value does this add and how does it align with being "inclusive"?

    • Sep 24 at 07:33 AM

      > As you see, when a moderator accepts an answer the OP cannot change that.

      And that's particularly problematic when the OP (as in the mentioned case) does clearly express that he would not have chosen that answer as best answer. That's a misuse of moderator rights in my book.

  • Add comment
    10|10000 characters needed characters exceeded